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DBN has great expectations for Hope Village. DBN CEO Martin Inkumbi, pictured with Hope Village Director Marietjie de Klerk, recently donated N$50,000 to Hope Village for construction of Veggietunnels which will grow food for the orphans and vulnerable children of the center, and the surrounding community.
DBN has great expectations for Hope Village. DBN CEO Martin Inkumbi, pictured with Hope Village Director Marietjie de Klerk, recently donated N$50,000 to Hope Village for construction of Veggietunnels which will grow food for the orphans and vulnerable children of the center, and the surrounding community.

Seed capital for Hope Village vegetable growing Development Bank of Namibia funds two Veggietunnels

Jun 20 2017

The Development Bank of Namibia (DBN) has made a donation of N$50,000 to Hope Village in Greenwell Matongo, Windhoek. The amount will be used to erect two Veggietunnels to cultivate vegetables, irrigation for the tunnels and supplies to establish cultivation in the tunnels.

 

Speaking about the donation, DBN CEO Martin Inkumbi said not all projects are able to benefit from the commercial approach that the Bank takes. To support projects of that do not qualify for traditional loans, the Bank sets aside a portion of its profits for corporate social investment.

 

The Hope Village Veggietunnels are what the Bank considers an excellent investment. Although DBN will not measure it in terms of financial returns, the Veggietunnels will create significant benefits for the children of Hope Village, the community of Greenwell Matongo and the future of Namibia.

 

By growing its own food, Hope Village will reduce its requirement for financing from external sources, and will be able to have greater security by providing sound nutrition for its family in a sustainable manner. Teaching children how to grow their own food, he added, makes them sustainable in later life. With the knowledge that food can be grown at home, the Bank hopes that they can become future producers for themselves, for their families, friends and communities.

 

Hope Village says that, in addition to food for the children, surplus produce will be sold to the community of Greenwell Matongo, and the project will create employment opportunities.

 

Inkumbi said a large part of urban Namibians do not have access to agricultural land or the means to produce food, and many lack the skills. Their experience of agriculture is that it is an exchange of cash for bags of fruit and vegetables. If the cash or produce is not available, nutrition is restricted.

 

He went on to say that DBN has implemented an environmental and social management system that promotes the wellbeing of people and the environment. The donation is informed by the Bank’s concern for both those aspects, now and in the future.

 

Inkumbi concluded by saying that DBN expects more from the future, and the donation is an expression of that hope.    

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