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The Development Bank of Namibia (DBN) issued the first notes under its N$ 2.5 billion Medium-Term Note Programme on Tuesday 5 September and raised a total amount of N$ 291 million.

The programme is part of the Bank’ strategy to diversify its source of funding and raise money on the market for on-lending to financially viable, environmental, and socially acceptable projects with developmental impact in line with the Bank’s business plan.

The 3-year bond (series “DBN20”) was issued through an oversubscribed auction process that was held on 31 August 2017. The bond pays a floating rate coupon quarterly, linked to the JIBAR rate and will mature on 4 September 2020.

The issue marks the first time that the Bank has formally approached Namibian capital markets to raise funding, and depending on future cash flow requirements, the Bank will be a regular issuer in the Namibian capital markets going forward. This is indeed a momentous occasion for the Bank which signaled market confidence in the Bank.

The Bank had planned to raise between N$200 million and N$ 300 million on its debut bond issue, and was well supported and oversubscribed by 26 staggered bids from 13 different investors both in Namibia and South Africa.

The total subscription amounted to N$ 428 million, and DBN issued a total amount of N$ 291 million at a spread of 190 basis points over the current JIBAR.

The Development Bank of Namibia’s N$2.5 billion Medium Term Note Programme aims to provide an alternative source of funding which forms part of the board approved funding strategy, in line with the bank’s targeted gearing ratio.

DBN has been well capitalized over the years by its sole shareholder- the Government of the Republic of Namibia, but now recognises that it needs to leverage its unencumbered balance sheet.

The Bank has also recently established a treasury function to manage its liquidity and funding needs, and is building an active presence in the Namibian money and capital markets in the realization of one of its core mandate.

The Development Bank of Namibia obtained a Long-Term Issuer Default rating of BBB- and National scale rating of AAA(zaf) by Fitch ratings.

This rating is equal to the sovereign (Government of the Republic of Namibia).

Development Bank of Namibia (DBN) CEO Martin Inkumbi has reiterated the Bank’s support for the manufacturing sector. The Bank is currently engaged in a drive to stimulate the sector with finance, and is reaching out to existing manufacturers with expansion plans, and potential manufacturing start-ups.

 

Inkumbi states that more consumption of locally manufactured goods is required to grow the local manufacturing sector. He adds that charity starts at home, and that to stimulate the sector, both public and private procurement policies and practices should give preference to goods that are produced locally.

 

This has benefits such as local employment creation and also improving the country’s balance of payments. The cost of a cheaper imported products can be much higher to the Namibian economy than the market price of that product, when lost employment opportunities and drains on the balance of payments are taken into account, he explains. Local value chains must be grown by procuring and consuming locally produced goods wherever possible.

 

Inkumbi says that the Bank believes that manufacturing can benefit from opportunities through import substitution, in line with NDP5 and the Growth-at-Home strategy. By seeking opportunities, and exploiting them, Namibian manufacturers can make progress towards achieving economies of scale.

 

This, will also be augmented by the ambitions of manufacturers to penetrate regional markets. Concerning regional markets, Inkumbi states that although South Africa and Angola are experiencing recessionary economic environments, there are opportunities in other countries in the SADC. He says that economic contraction is a cyclical phenomenon, and that the upward trend of growth resumes in the long-term.

 

He points out that a viable manufacturing enterprise will have the scope to increase its output in future, and encourages entrepreneurs with plans to initiate them now, rather than delay at the expense of future productivity.

 

In addition to DBN finance applied to local start-ups and expansion, Inkumbi notes that the Bank also makes the offer of trade finance. Regional expansion can be a costly exercise, however with availability of capital for expansion, cross-border ambition should be seen as an investment in long-term returns.

 

Talking about the Bank’s support to manufacturing, Inkumbi says that the Bank’s lending terms  are competitive for  manufacturers, however the Bank has expanded its own philosophy to encompass support in the early application phase as well as post borrowing.

 

In certain instances, where the Bank identifies strong development impact potential, the Bank will make available expertise and financial support for studies and knowledge gathering through its Project Preparation Fund (PPF). The aim of the PPF is to secure the viability of the project and seek means to mitigate risks prior to borrowing.

 

The Bank also provides access to a network of consultant business professionals who assist with capacity development after lending. This can be used to develop skills or streamline and strengthen operations to the benefit of the borrower.

 

Talking broadly about access to finance for manufacturers, Inkumbi says that manufacturing enterprises face challenges attaining the optimal financing mix. DBN’s experience indicates that manufacturing enterprises with a higher equity capital in the financing mix tend to do better than those funded solely with debt capital. Manufacturing enterprises require a longer period to achieve break-even, given the complexity of their environments and the need to secure markets for their products.

 

Inkumbi also points out that the Bank may, at its own discretion, recommend a repayment holiday for manufacturers on interest, capital or both, depending on the requirement of the borrower, the project's cash flow and factors which become apparent in the application assessment.

 

Talking about indirect benefits to commercial sources of finance, he goes on to say strong manufacturing base will improve the economic ecosystem, and this will also improve long-term prospects for the financial sector, which is a good reason for all financiers to support manufacturing enterprises. He adds that the DBN will consider financial syndication to spread risks.

 

This however, must be supported by local procurement policies and practices, and financiers should encourage this among their own clients, in effect creating networks of procurement centered on the encouragement and policy of the provider of capital.  If local consumers buy more local goods, this will result in higher sales revenues and better profitability for local manufacturers, which will makes it easier for local manufacturers to obtain finance from financiers.

 

Addressing manufacturers directly, he says that the Bank has a sound track record in financing the manufacturing sector, which includes cement, food processing, manufacturing of plastic goods, printing and agri-processing. Since its inception, the Bank has provided N$1.15 billion in finance to the manufacturing sector.

 

Manufacturing requires vision and ambition, and the Bank recognises this, and has commenced engaging local manufacturers, to better understand their challenges in raising capital. Manufacturers who have ambition and plans should make use of the Bank’s open door, and expect more, Inkumbi concludes    

The Development Bank of Namibia (DBN) has made a donation of N$50,000 to Hope Village in Greenwell Matongo, Windhoek. The amount will be used to erect two Veggietunnels to cultivate vegetables, irrigation for the tunnels and supplies to establish cultivation in the tunnels.

 

Speaking about the donation, DBN CEO Martin Inkumbi said not all projects are able to benefit from the commercial approach that the Bank takes. To support projects of that do not qualify for traditional loans, the Bank sets aside a portion of its profits for corporate social investment.

 

The Hope Village Veggietunnels are what the Bank considers an excellent investment. Although DBN will not measure it in terms of financial returns, the Veggietunnels will create significant benefits for the children of Hope Village, the community of Greenwell Matongo and the future of Namibia.

 

By growing its own food, Hope Village will reduce its requirement for financing from external sources, and will be able to have greater security by providing sound nutrition for its family in a sustainable manner. Teaching children how to grow their own food, he added, makes them sustainable in later life. With the knowledge that food can be grown at home, the Bank hopes that they can become future producers for themselves, for their families, friends and communities.

 

Hope Village says that, in addition to food for the children, surplus produce will be sold to the community of Greenwell Matongo, and the project will create employment opportunities.

 

Inkumbi said a large part of urban Namibians do not have access to agricultural land or the means to produce food, and many lack the skills. Their experience of agriculture is that it is an exchange of cash for bags of fruit and vegetables. If the cash or produce is not available, nutrition is restricted.

 

He went on to say that DBN has implemented an environmental and social management system that promotes the wellbeing of people and the environment. The donation is informed by the Bank’s concern for both those aspects, now and in the future.

 

Inkumbi concluded by saying that DBN expects more from the future, and the donation is an expression of that hope.